The Moon Will Forever Be a Distant Love



By: Luis Humberto Crosthwaite
Translator: Debbie Nathan, Willivaldo Delgadillo
The conquest is over and New Spain is overrun with conquistadors- turned-bureaucrats. Balboa is laid off. He convinces Florinda, his beloved Aztec maiden, to take the Three Stars bus from 16th century Mexico City to Tijuana in the Northernish Empire where they begin to map out their love. But can love survive on The Border at the end of the 20th century?
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Description

The conquest is over and New Spain is overrun with conquistadors- turned-bureaucrats.

Balboa is laid off. He convinces Florinda, his beloved Aztec maiden, to take the Three Stars bus from 16th century Mexico City to Tijuana in the Northernish Empire where they begin to map out their love. But can love survive on The Border at the end of the 20th century?

Translated by Debbie Nathan and Willivaldo Delgadillo.

Awards and Accomodations

Best Translation 1997, Texas Institute of Letters

1 review for The Moon Will Forever Be a Distant Love

  1. Library Journal
    Both these surreal novels are hugely entertaining love stories that circumvent time and place and culture, each with its own absurd, curious twist that makes us reexamine our concepts of borders. Crosthwaite’s tale chronicles the relationship of 16th-century conquistador Balboa and his true love, the Aztec Florinda (formerly Xchitl). Having “discovered” Mexico, what’s a conquistador to do with the rest of his life? Balboa isn’t sure, and when he loses his government job because of bureaucratic downsizing, the couple traverseby busa few miles and centuries and arrive in Tijuana, on the frontiers of the Northernish Empire. They split up, Balboa going to live with the fair-haired Mary Ann for awhile and Florindanow Xchitl againbecoming a candidate for shoe-aholics anonymous. Balboa is clueless, “as though instead of a conquistador he [is] an out-of-tune mariachi serenading a social-climbing Indian.” Instead of moving forward 400 or 500 years, Reyes’s novel circles back a mere four or five decades. In Mexico City, Barbara, a dying elderly woman, hires Juan, a street-smart twentysomething cabby, to be her chauffeur during the final weeks of her life. In her mint 1942 cherry-colored Ford, they revisit the neighborhoods of her youth, and both Barbara and Mexico City are rejuvenated; she even encounters her parents and her long-lost love at Sanborn’s House of Tiles. Both writers are well known in their native Mexico, and these funny, fast-moving novels, their first to be published in English are welcome additions to all literary collections.

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