Under Water



By: J.L. Powers
When her beloved grandmother dies, 17-year-old Khosi must learn to survive on her own. A sequel to Powers’ award-winning This Thing Called the Future, Under Water picks up 3 years later.
Clear
Categories: All Books | Fiction | Young Adult

Description

Teaching Guide for Under Water

When her beloved grandmother dies, 17-year-old Khosi must learn to survive on her own.

A sequel to Powers’ award-winning This Thing Called the Future, Under Water picks up 3 years later.

When her beloved grandmother dies, 17-year-old Khosi must learn to survive on her own. She has to take care of her little sister Zi, make a living as a traditional healer, and somehow try, despite everything, to finish school. When her beloved Imbali—an urban township in South Africa—flares up in violence, Khosi finds herself at the center of the storm.

A taxi war threatens the safety of every person in Imbali, including Khosi’s best friend and boyfriend Little Man. A murdered man is dumped on her doorstep. And accusations of witchcraft swirl around her, despite her every effort to keep her healing practice aboveboard. When Little Man chooses the wrong path, Khosi finds herself caught up in a new romance. But her past just might catch up to her.

6 reviews for Under Water

  1. Kirkus Reviews
    This slowly building novel avoids stereotype, offering a captivating narrative with nuanced perceptions of death, love, and cathartic self-discovery.

  2. The Horn Book
    [T]he treasures at the heart of this story are Khosi’s relationships—with her sister, whom she would do anything to protect; and with the ancestors, whose interference in her life is at times helpful, at times exasperating.

  3. Booklist
    Powers’ story is engaging. The depiction of life in Imbali is raw and honest, the struggles of the characters elicit sympathy, and Khosi’s questions about what she’s meant to do in life will ring familiar with young adult readers. —Florence Simmons

  4. New Pages
    For young adult readers, this is a book that will not sugar coat and will provoke thoughtful conversation about many difficult topics.

  5. School Library Journal
    Khosi’s transformation from sheltered township girl to sangoma is an extraordinary testament to strength, courage, and faith. Readers will find her self-respect refreshing and courtship with Sifiso supportive and nurturing at a natural pace. VERDICT All readers will easily root for Khosi, who makes a way out of loss with love and faith; a strong choice for teen libraries. —Donald Peebles

  6. Reading Style
    A moving story, impossible to forget or put aside. —Barbara Moon

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.